silent_films

The Road to Yesterday is a 1925 American silent romantic drama film directed by Cecil B. DeMille. The film is significant because it was Cecil B. DeMille's first release from his new production company, DeMille Pictures Corporation. It was also upcoming actor William Boyd's first starring role. In DeMille's next picture, The Volga Boatman, which was a tremendous success, he cast Boyd as the solo leading man.

Don Q, Son of Zorro is a 1925 American silent romantic adventure film that is sequel to the 1920 silent film The Mark of Zorro. It was loosely based upon the 1909 novel Don Q.'s Love Story, written by the mother-and-son duo Kate and Hesketh Hesketh-Prichard. The story was reworked in 1925 (after Hesketh Hesketh-Prichard's death) into a vehicle for the Johnston McCulley character Zorro.

The film was well-received: the New York Times rated it one of its top ten movies of 1925.

The Rag Man is a 1925 American comedy drama film starring Jackie Coogan. The film was directed by Edward F. Cline, and written by Willard Mack.

Tim Kelly (Jackie Coogan) is a kid who runs away from an orphanage on the Lower East Side in New York after a fire breaks out. He ends up taking refuge with Max (Max Davidson), a lonely junk man who is down on his luck after being cheated out of a patent fortune by some unscrupulous lawyers. Little Kelly and Max form a partnership in the bottle and rag business, and eventually become close companions.

Shore Leave is a 1925 American silent comedy film directed by John S. Robertson and starring Richard Barthelmess and Dorothy Mackaill.

Shore Leave is based on the stage play of the same name written by Hubert Osborne. The play ran on Broadway at the Lyceum Theatre from August 8 to December 1922 for a total of 151 performances. The play starred James Rennie and Frances Starr in the leads played by Barthelmess and Mackaill in the film.

The Pony Express is a 1925 American silent Western film, The film was directed by James Cruze and starred his wife, Betty Compson, along with Ricardo Cortez, Wallace Beery, and George Bancroft.

The Unchastened Woman is a 1925 American silent drama film starring vamp Theda Bara, directed by James Young, the former husband of Clara Kimball Young, and released by start-up studio Chadwick Pictures. The film is based on a 1915 Broadway play, The Unchastened Woman, which starred Emily Stevens.

This was Bara's "comeback" film and as it turned out her final feature appearance and is one of her few surviving films. The play was also filmed in 1918 with Grace Valentine.

After celebrating too much the night before his wedding and turning up late and dishevelled, Tom Hayden is abandoned by his fiancée and disowned by his family. In order to redeem himself he travels west to take place in a major auto race in California.

Cast
Reginald Denny as Tom Hayden
Gertrude Olmstead as Betty Browne
Tom Wilson as Sambo
Charles K. Gerrard as Creighton Deane
Lucille Ward as Mrs. Browne
John Steppling as Jeffrey Browne
Fred Esmelton as Mr. Hayden
Frances Raymond as Mrs. Hayden
Leo Nomis as James

The story is about a clerk who is given $10,000 to deposit at the bank, but the bank is closed for the night so he tries to get to the bank president's house with the money.

A European Countess visits relatives in the United States where her continental freedoms clash with the morals of a small American town. She smokes a cigarette in public and wears flashy makeup. A crusading District Attorney stops at nothing to have her leave town and expose her for her loose ways only to fall in love with her himself.

Randy Farman, who demonstrates camping outfits in a department store, wins a racing car in a raffle and sets out for the West. He runs out of gas, loses all his money, and falls in love with a girl called Doris, who, accompanied by her aunt, is on her way to Nampa City to claim an inheritance.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - silent_films