Public Domain Movies released in 1943

In a peaceful Ukrainian village, the school year is just ending in June 1941. Five young friends set out for a walking trip to Kiev, but their travels are brutally interrupted when they are suddenly attacked by German planes, in the first wave of the Nazi assault on the Soviet Union.

Nach einem Hinweis von einem seltsamen Mann begeben sich der hartgesottene Berichterstatter Jeff Carter und die beherzte Fotografin Billie Mason auf die Suche nach dem unter rätselhaften Umständen verschwundenen Drüsenfacharzt Dr. James Brewster. In der Zwischenzeit versetzt ein mörderischer Affenmann die Stadt in Angst und Schrecken … 1942 in nur 19 Tagen fertig gestellt, war „The Ape Man“ („Der Affenmann“) der sechste von insgesamt neun Monogram-Filmen mit Bela Lugosi.

Produced by the U.S. Army Special Service Division, and directed by Frank Capra "Why We Fight" is a seven part propaganda/documentary series that traces the earliest beginnings of the second world war starting with Japan's invasion of China in 1931, to the Nazi's march across europe. This is a remasterd version encoded for Apple TV.

Fell in the public domain because it was made for the American government and all films made for or by the government of the U.S.A. are in the public domain. From IMDB: Donald Duck deals with income taxes and their benefit to the American war effort in this inspirational documentary short animated film.

Produced by the U.S. Army Special Service Division, and directed by Frank Capra "Why We Fight" is a seven part propaganda/documentary series that traces the earliest beginnings of the second world war starting with Japan's invasion of China in 1931, to the Nazi's march across europe. This is a remasterd version encoded for Apple TV.

Scandalous for it's time, "The Outlaw" directed by Howard Hughes, is the story of Billy the Kid, Doc Holiday, and Pat Garrett. The plot is thin at best, but we are introduced to a 22 year old Jane Russell which makes the film almost worthwhile.

The first of the Mr. Hook cartoon series, his main purpose was to sell war bonds. Hook is set a decade in the future, and he is telling his young son about his exploits during the war and how war bonds helped him defeat an evil Japanese pilot who was trying to attack the fleet.

Though loaded with clichés such as rousing pre-battle speeches and over-dramatized death scenes, Gung Ho tells a more-or-less true story about the successful deployment of the Makin Raiders (Carlson's Raiders) on a minor Japanese stronghold (Makin Atoll). Fifteen thousand men volunteer, and in the end, only 200 make the team. These two hundred men will adopt the Chinese phrase Gung Ho (roughly translated as working harmoniously) as a philosophical approach to the task at hand.

A cartoon in which Private Snafu, while drunk, reveals military secrets that allow the enemy to torpedo his ship. This is one of 26 Private SNAFU ('Situation Normal, All Fouled Up) cartoons made by the US Army Signal Corps to educate and boost the morale the troops. Originally created by Theodore Geisel (Dr. Seuss) and Phil Eastman, most of the cartoons were produced by Warner Brothers Animation Studios - employing their animators, voice actors (primarily Mel Blanc) and Carl Stalling's music. From the holdings of the National Archives. NAIL: 111-M-929 ARC Identifier: 35827

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