RKO Radio Pictures

The House I Live In was a 1945 short film written by Albert Maltz and made by producer Frank Ross and actor Frank Sinatra to oppose anti-Semitism and prejudice at the end of World War II. It received a special Academy Award in 1946.

A thug (Hugh Trevor) robs a young engaged couple (Marian Nixon and William Janney) of their last few dollars. When the thug's gang boss (Lowell Sherman) hears of the robbery, he gives them back their money and takes them under his wing. The thug, resentful of the couple, plans to organize a mutiny against the gang's boss, but when he is killed in a botched robbery, the police focus their attention on the young couple.

This was the first film shown at the RKO Roxy Theater. An awkward love triangle is created when a publisher (Howard) encounters a moral speed bump and engages in an affair with an open-minded artist (Harding) while married to a stodgy suburbanite (Loy). Complicating matters is the tendency of the mistress to play the role of unassuming wife while inelegant and deceptive wife acts as the mistress.

Taken from IMDB:Two fast-talking insurance salesmen meet Mary, who is running away from her wealthy mother, and they agree to help her run a hotel that she owns. When they find out that the hotel is run down and nearly abandoned, they launch a phony PR campaign that presents the hotel as a resort favored by the rich. Their advertising succeeds too well, and many complications soon arise.

Blue collar steelworker Richard Brunton (Joel McCrea) saves two of his fellow workers after an accident at a factory. In gratitude, his boss, millionaire Arthur Parker (Robert McWade) invites Richard for dinner with his family. Arthur's daughter Dot (Dorothy Mackaill) is instantly impressed and infatuated with Richard She vows to marry him within a month.

An American (Ralph Forbes) joins the French Foreign Legion in order to rescue a boyhood friend.

Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey are privates in WWI France who chase girls, trade bad jokes and win battles.

This was the first comedy that Laurel and Hardy starred in without producer Hal Roach, although they had previously been "guest stars" in four MGM movies. After they finished making "The Flying Deuces," they returned to Hal Roach Studios to make films. In order to make this movie, producer Boris Morros bought the rights to the 1931 French film "Les deux legionnaires," which had a similar plot. "The Flying Deuces" was Morros' first independent production and it was shot in continuity over a span of four weeks. Only one day was reportedly needed for retakes.

Mary Astor plays a receptionist at a paper mill company. She has her eye on Robert Ames, a young salesman with the company. When the boss is forced to retire, Mary Astor pushes for Robert Ames to take the job, and when he does, Mary is promoted to being his secretary. She is secretly in love with him, only he never seems to notice. As he rises in the company Mary Astor is constantly by his side, giving good business advice as well as advice in his personal life. When Ames marries someone else, Astor is so upset he quits, and the company begins to fall apart.

Walter Brennan plays the part of a father raising four children, but has his own ideas about how to run a farm.

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