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The Beloved Rogue

1927

The Beloved Rogue showcases one of Barrymore's better performances. The great German actor Conrad Veidt (Casablanca) co-stars as the king. Also of note is the magnificent, whimsical set designed by William Cameron Menzies. A swashbuckling John Barrymore, as 15th century poet Francois Villon, takes on King Louis XI to save his paramour.


The Beloved Rogue is a 1927 United States silent film, loosely based on the life of the 15th century French poet, François Villon. The film was directed by Alan Crosland for United Artists.
François Villon is played by John Barrymore, and other cast members include Conrad Veidt as King Louis XI and Marceline Day as Charlotte de Vauxcelles.
The story had been filmed in 1920 as If I Were King (1920 film) with William Farnum. The film was later re-made in the sound era again reverting to its original title If I Were King with Ronald Colman.

Plot


Cast

  • John Barrymore—François Villon
  • Conrad Veidt—King Louis XI
  • Marceline Day—Charlotte de Vauxcelles
  • Lawson Butt—Duke of Burgundy
  • Henry Victor—Thibault d'Aussigny
  • Slim Summerville—Jehan
  • Mack Swain—Nicholas
  • Angelo Rossitto—Beppo the Dwarf
  • Nigel De Brulier—Astrologer
  • Lucy Beaumont—Villon's mother
  • Otto Matieson—Olivier (as Otto Mattiesen)
  • Jane Winton—The Abbess
  • Rose Dione—Margot
  • Bertram Grassby—Duke of Orleans
  • Dick Sutherland—Tristan l'Hermite
  • Martha Franklin—Maid (uncredited)
  • Stubby Kruger -- (uncredited)
  • Dickie Moore (actor)—Baby Francois (uncredited)

Production

This film was lost for some 40 years until a beautiful tinted & toned copy was discovered in the late 1960s in the collection of film pioneer Mary Pickford. Pickford, an early champion of film preservation, tried saving all things "United Artist", the production company in which she was a founder. Barrymore's Eternal Love (1929 film) (1929) is another UA film Pickford preserved. This surviving Pickford print of The Beloved Rogue represents what a true tinted & toned silent film looks like, made directly on tinted film stock prevalent in the silent era.

Reception

John Barrymore viewed the premiere of the film with a large picture palace audience. Unbeknownst to the audience he was standing at the back of the movie house. Barrymore apparently was discontented or bemused with his own performance stating, "...what a ham".


Category:1927 films
Category:American films
Category:American silent feature films
Category:Black-and-white films
Category:François Villon
Category:1920s adventure films
Category:Swashbuckler films
Category:Films set in the 15th century
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