Public Domain Movies - Feature Films

Our Hospitality


Our Hospitality is a 1923 silent comedy film directed by and starring Buster Keaton. Released by Metro Pictures Corporation, the film uses slapstick and situational comedy to tell the story of Willie McKay, who gets caught in the middle of the infamous "Canfield"–"McKay" feud, an obvious satire of the real-life Hatfield–McCoy feud.

Scaramouche


Scaramouche (1923) is a silent costume adventure based on the novel Scaramouche by Rafael Sabatini, directed by Rex Ingram, released by Metro Pictures, and starring Ramón Novarro, Alice Terry, Lewis Stone, and Lloyd Ingraham.

Scaramouche became public domain in the United States on January 1, 2019

ZAZA


Zaza is a 1923 American silent romantic drama film directed and produced by Allan Dwan, and starring Gloria Swanson. This film is based on the 1899 French play of the same name produced on Broadway by David Belasco and starring Mrs. Leslie Carter. A print of the film is housed at the George Eastman House and the Library of Congress.

A previous film version was released by Paramount in 1915 starring Pauline Frederick. A third version, directed by George Cukor and starring Claudette Colbert, was released in 1939.

The Extra Girl


The Extra Girl is a 1923 American silent comedy film directed by F. Richard Jones and starring Mabel Normand. Produced by Mack Sennett, The Extra Girl followed earlier films about the film industry and also paved the way for later films about Hollywood, such as King Vidor’s Show People (1928). It was still unusual in 1923 for filmmakers to make a film about the southern California film industry, then little more than ten years old. Still, many of the Hollywood clichés of small town girls travelling to Hollywood to become film stars are here to reinforce the myths of Tinseltown.

Buster Keaton’s Sherlock Jr.


Sherlock Jr. is a 1924 American silent comedy film directed by and starring Buster Keaton and written by Clyde Bruckman, Jean Havez, and Joseph A. Mitchell. It features Kathryn McGuire, Joe Keaton, and Ward Crane.

In 1991, Sherlock Jr. was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant." In 2000, the American Film Institute, as part of its AFI 100 Years... series, ranked the film #62 in its list of the funniest films of all time (AFI's 100 Years... 100 Laughs).

Girl Shy


Girl Shy is a 1924 romantic comedy silent film starring Harold Lloyd and Jobyna Ralston. The movie was written by Sam Taylor, Tim Whelan and Ted Wilde and was directed by Fred C. Newmeyer and Taylor. In 2020, the film entered the public domain.

Hot Water

Harold Lloyd

Hot Water is a 1924 American silent comedy film directed by Fred C. Newmeyer and Sam Taylor and starring Harold Lloyd.

Directed by Fred Newmeyer and Sam Taylor, it features three episodes in the life of Hubby (Lloyd) as he struggles with domestic life with Wifey (Jobyna Ralston) and his in-laws.

He Who Gets Slapped


He Who Gets Slapped is a 1924 American silent psychological thriller film starring Lon Chaney, Norma Shearer, and John Gilbert, and directed by Victor Sjöström. The film is based on the Russian play Тот, кто получает пощёчины ("He Who Gets Slapped", transliterated as Tot, kto polučájet poščóčiny) by playwright Leonid Andreyev, which was published in 1914 and in English, as He Who Gets Slapped, in 1922. The Russian original was made into a Russian movie in 1916.

The Signal Tower


The Signal Tower is a 1924 American silent drama film directed by Clarence Brown and produced and distributed by Universal Pictures. The film stars Virginia Valli, Rockliffe Fellowes, and Wallace Beery.

Cast
Virginia Valli as Sally Taylor
Rockliffe Fellowes as Dave Taylor
Frankie Darro as Sonny Taylor
Wallace Beery as Joe Standish
James O. Barrows as Old Bill
J. Farrell MacDonald as Pete
Dot Farley as Cousin Gertie
Clarence Brown as Switch Man
Jitney the Dog as Jitney

Beau Brummel


Beau Brummel is a 1924 American silent film historical drama starring John Barrymore and Mary Astor. The film was directed by Harry Beaumont and based upon Clyde Fitch's 1890 play, which had been performed by Richard Mansfield, and depicts the life of the British Regency dandy Beau Brummell.

Several years after Barrymore's death, his daughter Diana Barrymore was shown a special screening of this film as she had never seen her father in any of his silent films.

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