Public Domain Movies - Cartoons

A Tale Of Two Kitties


A Tale of Two Kitties is an American Merrie Melodies cartoon, released in 1942, notable for the first appearance of a flesh colored canary, who would come to be known as Tweety. It was directed by Bob Clampett, written by Warren Foster, and features music by Carl W. Stalling. It was also the first appearance of Babbit and Catstello, based on the popular comedy duo Abbott and Costello. The title is an obvious pun on the Charles Dickens classic, A Tale of Two Cities.

[Looney Tunes] Daffy - The Commando


Original description: "Public domain Looney Tunes cartoon featuring Daffy fighting the Nazis."

The Impatient Patient


Singing-telegram delivery boy Daffy Duck catches the hiccups and must deliver a message to the evil abode of mad scientist Dr. Jerkle, another in the many Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde parodies. He decides to try and kill two birds with one stone and ask the doctor to cure him, but Dr. Jerkle drinks a potion that turns him into a frightening monster named "Chloe," to whom Daffy's message was originally intended. When Daffy is ultimately trapped in the house with the goofy but threatening Mr.

90 Day Wondering


90 Day Wondering (1956) United States Army/Warner Bros. Directed by seasoned Warner Bros. animator Chuck Jones and featuring the voice of Mel Blanc, we see young soldier Ralph Phillips re-entering the civilian world and puzzling over reenlisting.

Ding Dong Daddy


Ding Dog Daddy was a 1942 color Merrie Melodies cartoon, directed by Friz Freleng and written by Tedd Pierce. The title is a play on a popular expression, as in the song "I'm A Ding Dong Daddy From Dumas".

Crosby, Columbo And Vallee


Crosby, Columbo, and Vallee is a 1932 Merrie Melodies cartoon short directed by Rudolf Ising. It lampoons the popularity of crooners among young women, with popular crooners Bing Crosby, Russ Columbo, and Rudy Vallée being the namesake of the film.

Hold Anything


Hold Anything was the third short in the Looney Tunes series from Warner Bros., released to theaters in November 1930. Featuring Bosko (the star of Looney Tunes shorts of that time), it was loosely based on the lost film Hold Everything, one of whose songs, "Don't Hold Everything," features prominently in the cartoon. It was directed by Hugh Harman and Rudolph Ising, and animated by Isadore "Friz" Freleng and Norman Blackburn.

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